Literature

Chloe Coker (nee Blackburn) (F. 1994-99) left Brighton College to study modern languages at Oxford University and then practised law for an American law firm in the city, where she specialised in fraud litigation. However, her life has now taken a very different path, which she recently wrote in to tell us about...

Daniel Peltz, former British Land director and founder of retail property investor London Freeholds, has won rave reviews for his second novel.

Dr Paul E H Davis (D. 1974-79), who lives in Hove, Sussex, was educated at Brighton College, the University of Chichester, and the University of Buckingham where he studied for his Masters' degrees, and later for his D.Phil.

Edward Carpenter was an early gay activist who also helped found the Labour Party. He was a philosopher, poet and political activist.

A noted Shakespearean scholar and writer, born in Hove, England. Professor Harrison converted to the Roman Catholic faith and for his work on the International Commission on English in the Liturgy (ICEL), Pope John Paul II made him a Knight of the Order of St Gregory the Great.

Jamie Thomson (H. 1972-75), author, games designer and all round creative gem recently won the Roald Dahl Prize for his wonderful book "Dark Lord: Teenage Years". Born in Iran, Jamie then grew up in Brighton where he met one of his co-authors Mark Smith (B. 1972-77) at school at Brighton College. He graduated from the University of Kent with a degree in politics and government.

Novelist and poet, born in Plymouth, Devon, SW England, UK.

He studied at Oxford, and took up school teaching until he established a reputation as a lyric poet with Dublin Days (1921), The Lowery Road (1923), and other volumes. He also wrote novels, including Dewer Rides (1929), a macabre novel set in Dartmoor, and Deliverance (1955). His collection of short stories, Travellers (1945), won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize.

Ewart Alan Mackintosh (4 March 1893 – 23 November 1917) was a war poet and an officer in the Seaforth Highlanders from December 1914. Mackintosh was killed whilst observing the second day of the second Battle of Cambrai, 21 November 1917. His best poetry has been said to be comparable in quality to that of Rupert Brooke.

Nigel Kemble-Clarkson (A. 1953-57) is a cheerful raconteur with a great sense of the ridiculous, and a practised eye for the ladies.

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